Please: Login/Register

The Latest Edition of "Eyes on malaria" magazine will be out very soon!! | CALL FOR ARTICLES: AMMREN is inviting journalists / writers / scientists interested in reporting on malaria to send articles for publication in its international magazine “Eyes on Malaria” and for posting on its website. Please contact the AMMREN Secretariat for more details click here. Enjoy your stay!. Volunteers and interns urgently needed to work with an NGO working in the area of malaria and health. Apply through - ammren1@gmail.com / ammren1@yahoo.com. Journalists interested in reporting on and writing articles on health issues should please reply through this email: ammren1@gmail.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS:::

TIPS ON MALARIA

  • HOW CAN MOSQUITOES BE CONTROLLED?

    Mosquitoes around the home can be reduced significantly by minimizing the amount of standing water available for mosquito breeding. Residents are urged to reduce standing water around the home in a variety of ways.

  • HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF FROM MOSQUITO-BORN DISEASES?

    The best way is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.This can be accomplished using personal protecting  while outdoors when mosquitoes are present. Treated bed nets should be used sleeping. Mosquito repellent should be used when outdoor.

  • WHO ARE AT RISK?


    Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk of getting malaria. Pregnant women are particularly at risk of malaria. Children under 5 years are at high risk of malaria.
     

MAGAZINE EDITIONS

  • First Edition

  • Second Edition

  • Third Edition

  • Fourth Edition

  • Fifth Edition

  • Sixth Edition

  • Seventh Edition

  • Eighth Edition

  • Ninth Edition

  • Special Edition

  • INESS Edition

  • Tenth Edition

  • INDEPTH Edition

  • Eleventh Edition

  • Twelfth Edition

  • Special Edition

  • Special Edition

  • Volume 1

MALARIA VACCINE TARGET'S INVASION PARTNER UNCOVERED

 
A team at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has discovered how a promising malarial vaccine target - the protein RH5 - helps parasites to invade human red blood cells.
 
Published in Nature Communications, the study reveals that a previously mysterious protein on the  surface  of the  parasite  called  P113  anchors the  RH5  protein,  and  provides  a  molecular  bridge  between the parasite and a red blood cell.  The discovery could be used to make a more effective  malaria vaccine.
 
More than 200 million people a year are infected with malaria and the disease caused the deaths of  nearly half a million people worldwide in 2015. Children under the age of five made up 70 percent of  these deaths. Malaria is caused by Plasmodium parasites which are spread by infected mosquitos  and an effective vaccine would vastly improve the lives of millions of people.
 
Previous research by teams at the Sanger Institute discovered that to invade human red blood cells,  Plasmodium parasites need RH5 to bind to a receptor called basigin on the surface of the blood cells.  
 
However, it was not known how RH5 was attached to the surface of the parasite. In this latest study the researchers discovered that when the Plasmodium RH5 proteinis released, it is  immediately caught by another parasite protein called P113. Thousands of P113 molecules on the  surface of each parasite act like a Velcro chain, capturing RH5 at the surface of the parasite.  
 
The tethered RH5 then binds to the basigin receptor on the human red blood cell, bridging the gap  just long enough to let the parasite invade the blood cell. Dr Julian Rayner, an author on the study from the Sanger Institute, said: "We knew both proteins were essential for invasion but this is the first time anyone has seen the interaction between RH5 and P113 and showed that they work together.
 
In theory, an antibody that blocked P113 could stop RH5  binding and so prevent the parasite from gaining entry to red blood cells. This makes the P113  protein another good vaccine target." 
 
Credit: https://phys.org/news
Editions: 
March Edition