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The Latest Edition of "Eyes on malaria" magazine will be out very soon!! | CALL FOR ARTICLES: AMMREN is inviting journalists / writers / scientists interested in reporting on malaria to send articles for publication in its international magazine “Eyes on Malaria” and for posting on its website. Please contact the AMMREN Secretariat for more details click here. Enjoy your stay!. Volunteers and interns urgently needed to work with an NGO working in the area of malaria and health. Apply through - ammren1@gmail.com / ammren1@yahoo.com. Journalists interested in reporting on and writing articles on health issues should please reply through this email: ammren1@gmail.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS:::

TIPS ON MALARIA

  • HOW CAN MOSQUITOES BE CONTROLLED?

    Mosquitoes around the home can be reduced significantly by minimizing the amount of standing water available for mosquito breeding. Residents are urged to reduce standing water around the home in a variety of ways.

  • HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF FROM MOSQUITO-BORN DISEASES?

    The best way is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.This can be accomplished using personal protecting  while outdoors when mosquitoes are present. Treated bed nets should be used sleeping. Mosquito repellent should be used when outdoor.

  • WHO ARE AT RISK?


    Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk of getting malaria. Pregnant women are particularly at risk of malaria. Children under 5 years are at high risk of malaria.
     

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  • Volume 1

Facts about malaria

When was  the Malaria Parasite discovered?
6th of November 1880

Who discovered  the Malaria Parasite?
Charles  Louis  Alphonse  Laveran,  a  French  army  surgeon stationed  in  Constantine,  Algeria,  was  the  first  to  notice parasites  in  the blood of a patient suffering  from malaria.

How  is Malaria  transmitted?
On  August  20th,  1897,  Ronald  Ross,  a  British  officer  in  the Indian  Medical  Service,  was  the  first  to  demonstrate  that malaria parasites could be transmitted from infected patients to mosquitoes. In further work with bird malaria, Ross showed that mosquitoes could transmit malaria parasites from bird to bird.  This  necessitated  a  sporogonic  cycle  (the  time  interval during which  the parasite developed  in  the mosquito). Thus, the problem of malaria  transmission was solved.

Malaria transmission rates can differ depending on  local factors such as rainfall patterns (mosquitoes breed in wet conditions), the proximity of mosquito breeding sites to people, and types of mosquito  species  in  the  area.  Some  regions  have  a  fairly constant number of cases throughout the year  - these countries are  termed  "malaria  endemic". In  other  areas  there  are "malaria seasons" usually coinciding with  the  rainy season.

Large and devastating epidemics can occur when the mosquito-borne parasite is introduced into areas where people have had little prior contact with the infecting parasite and have little or no  immunity  to malaria, or when people with  low  immunity move  into  areas  where  malaria  cases  are  constant.  These epidemics  can  be  triggered  by wet weather  conditions  and further aggravated by floods or mass population movements
driven by conflict.

Useful links
WHO:
http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/malaria/en/index.html

Global Gender and Malaria
Network:http:/www.rollbackmalaria.org/globaladvocacy/networks.html

Roll Back Malaria Partnership:
Http:/www.rollback.org

WHO, Global Malaria Programme website:
Http:/www.who.int/malaria/

The Malaria Knowledge programme LSTM:
http:/www.liv.ac.uk/lstm/majorprogs/malaria/index.htm

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation:
http://www.gatesfoundation.org/topics/Pages/malaria.aspx

African Malaria Network Trust:
http:/www.amanet-trust.org

Malaria Consortium:
http://www.malariaconsortium.org

Editions: 
Fifth Edition