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The Latest Edition of "Eyes on malaria" magazine will be out very soon!! | CALL FOR ARTICLES: AMMREN is inviting journalists / writers / scientists interested in reporting on malaria to send articles for publication in its international magazine “Eyes on Malaria” and for posting on its website. Please contact the AMMREN Secretariat for more details click here. Enjoy your stay!. Volunteers and interns urgently needed to work with an NGO working in the area of malaria and health. Apply through - ammren1@gmail.com / ammren1@yahoo.com. Journalists interested in reporting on and writing articles on health issues should please reply through this email: ammren1@gmail.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS:::

TIPS ON MALARIA

  • HOW CAN MOSQUITOES BE CONTROLLED?

    Mosquitoes around the home can be reduced significantly by minimizing the amount of standing water available for mosquito breeding. Residents are urged to reduce standing water around the home in a variety of ways.

  • HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF FROM MOSQUITO-BORN DISEASES?

    The best way is to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.This can be accomplished using personal protecting  while outdoors when mosquitoes are present. Treated bed nets should be used sleeping. Mosquito repellent should be used when outdoor.

  • WHO ARE AT RISK?


    Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk of getting malaria. Pregnant women are particularly at risk of malaria. Children under 5 years are at high risk of malaria.
     

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EDITORIAL

As the days  draw nearer to 2015 malaria targets,  stakeholders have intensified moves to scale-up interventions to end malaria deaths, as a first step in the march towards elimination, instead of merely trying to control the disease.

Stakeholders are compelled to take a hard look at the situation to build on the gains
achieved so far, what is being done right and what should be avoided.

The good  news is that today, malaria can be prevented,  diagnosed and treated. The key tools for prevention include long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs), indoor residual spraying (IRS), intermittent preventive treatment for pregnant women (IPTp) in high transmission settings and vector control measures such as larviciding.

The  World Health Organisation  (WHO) has  recommended  artemisinin-based combination  therapies  (ACTs) for treatment  against  P.  falciparum malaria while chloroquine (CQ) and  primaquine (PQ) remain the  treatment of choice  against chloroquine-sensitive P. vivax malaria.

Over the past decade, malaria has received a lot of attention. According to the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) partnership, more than twenty lower-burden countries around the world are already poised  to eliminate malaria within their borders. This brings hope that malaria can be eliminated with modern tools in high-transmission areas. However, many countries still have more work to do.

It is obvious that in spite of the efficacy of today's tools, eradicating malaria will require new and improved tools that are effective across geographical borders. The RBM is therefore advocating  more  research  because it  plays  a crucial role in documenting  lessons learned from the field and providing more insight to inform new policies.

For twelve long years (2000 - 2012), malaria was merely reduced by 31% in Africa. Malaria mortality in Africa was reduced by 49% over the last twelve years. The world is waiting for the malaria vaccine, which is likely to be licensed  in 2015. The big question is, 'Can the vaccine provide the final push towards malaria elimination?’

The WHO remains hopeful however that when funds are provided for 200 million LLINs to be delivered this year, it will be a “strong pipeline” in the period preceding  the target date of 2015.

In 2013,  an estimated  136 million LLINs were delivered to endemic  countries, showing a major increase over the 70 million bed nets delivered in 2012. But, this is not enough.

It is comforting, however, to know that as malaria gets more attention, the fight will surely succeed. But, most  countries  are still  very far from realising this  dream because of lack of funds to fight the disease.

There is good reason for all hands to be on deck to kick out malaria from Africa. This will yield positive economic   benefits,  leading  to poverty reduction  and  better standards of living. More commitment is needed. Action Now!!!!
 
EDITORIAL TEAM

Charity Binka
MANAGING EDITOR

Carlton Cofie
EDITOR

Eunice Menka
ASSISTANT EDITOR

COUNTRY CO-ORDINATORS

James Addy        
Ghana

Rebecca Chimjeka
Malawi

Isaiah Esipisu
Kenya

Momodou  Faal
Gambia

Mbarwa Kivuyo
Tanzania

Idrissa Ndiaye
Senegal

THE  PUBLISHER

African Media & Malaria Research Network
P. O.  Box CT 10479, Cantonments, Accra.
29 Garden  Road - East Legon, Accra- Ghana
Tel: +233 (0) 303 933 452
Email: ammren1@yahoo.com ammren1@gmail.com
info@eyesonmalaria.org Websites: www.ammren.org www.eyesonmalaria.org
 

Editions: 
Twelfth Edition